books

TOC

The Selfish Gene

is a 1976 book on evolution by Richard Dawkins, in which he builds upon the principal theory of George C. Williams’s Adaptation and Natural Selection (1966). Dawkins uses the term “selfish gene” as a way of expressing the gene-centred view of evolution as opposed to the views focused on the organism and the group, popularising ideas developed during the 1960s by W. D. Hamilton and others. From the gene-centred view, it follows that the more two individuals are genetically related, the more sense (at the level of the genes) it makes for them to behave selflessly with each other.

To Explain the World

A masterful commentary on the history of science from the Greeks to modern times, by Nobel Prize-winning physicist Steven Weinberg—a thought-provoking and important book by one of the most distinguished scientists and intellectuals of our time.

Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration

Creativity, Inc. is a book for managers who want to lead their employees to new heights, a manual for anyone who strives for originality, and the first-ever, all-access trip into the nerve center of Pixar Animation—into the meetings, postmortems, and “Braintrust” sessions where some of the most successful films in history are made. It is, at heart, a book about how to build a creative culture—but it is also, as Pixar co-founder and president Ed Catmull writes, “an expression of the ideas that I believe make the best in us possible.”

ReWork: Change the Way You Work Forever

Rework is the perfect playbook for anyone who’s ever dreamed of doing it on their own. Hardcore entrepreneurs, small-business owners, people stuck in day jobs who want to get out, and artists who don’t want to starve anymore will all find valuable inspiration and guidance in these pages.

CSS MASTER

TIFFANY B. BROWN, CSS has grown from a language for formatting documents into a robust language for designing web applications. Its syntax is easy to learn, making CSS a great entry point for those new to programming. Indeed, it’s often the second language that developers learn, right behind HTML.

Tesla: Man Out of Time

Margaret Cheney explores the brilliant and prescient mind of Nikola Tesla, one of the twentieth century’s greatest scientists and inventors. (TO READ)

Byte of vim

https://vim.swaroopch.com/

Masterminds Of Programming

2016/11/25/masterminds-of-programming

Simple Sabotage Field Manual

2016/08/11/simple-sabotage-field-manual

Unix history

2016/08/25/unix-history

Parallel Worlds

A Journey Through Creation, Higher Dimensions, and the Future of the Cosmos is a popular science book by Michio Kaku first published in 2004.

Alan Turing and his contemporaries, Building the world’s first computers

Whilst mercury delay-line storage systems were being developed at NPL, Cambridge and elsewhere, another line of research had been started in America. Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) had attempted to memorise, or store, a radar scan using electrostatic charges inside a cathode ray tube (CRT). (1946)

^ This one is probably not worth reading, besides those little interesting pieces of computer history info.

“Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman!”

Anekdotes, but the main idea is ‘how to think about things’.

It’s nice that I got some money ­­ I was able to buy a beach house ­­ but altogether, I think it would have been much nicer not to have had the Prize ­­ because you never, any longer, can be taken straightforwardly in any public situation.

Chasing New Horizons: Inside the Epic First Mission to Pluto

In January of 2006, a tiny one-thousand-pound spacecraft, mounted on top of a powerful 224-foot-tall rocket, blasted off from Cape Canaveral, Florida. Thus began the longest and farthest journey of exploration our species has ever attempted—a journey to explore Pluto, the last of the unvisited planets known at the dawn of the Space Age. That spaceship, aptly named New Horizons, carried the hopes and dreams of a team of scientists and engineers who had poured much of their lives into what had—at many times—seemed an improbable quest.

There were many reasons that some expected Pluto to be a relatively dead world, geologically speaking. After all, it is such a small planet, and it lacks the tidal heat sources that being in a giant planet’s satellite system would provide. Also, it is far from the Sun and solar heating is weak. So, by the conventional wisdom born of exploring the rest of the solar system, Pluto should have been largely or even completely geologically inactive for eons. But the conventional wisdom was seriously wrong. New Horizons found a wide range of surface ages, ranging from ancient and heavily cratered to completely fresh-looking areas with no craters at all— meaning that Pluto has been geologically active throughout its 4- billion-year history. In fact, Pluto has been alive and kicking throughout history, and is even today. Why that is so is the subject of intense scientific debate and modeling, and it portends that we can expect more surprises when other small planets in the Kuiper Belt are explored.

Space Odyssey - Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece

HAL’s red eye was actually a Nikon 8-millimeter wide-angle lens lit from behind.

On hearing that they still hadn’t figured out how HAL could overhear them, Lyndon looked at Dullea and Lockwood as though it was the most obvious thing in the world. “He could just read your lips,” he said. There was a moment of thunderstruck silence. “God, that’s a great idea!” Kubrick exclaimed. They had their answer.

Memory Machines - The Evolution of Hypertext (Belinda Barnet)

Engelbart believes that human beings live within an existing technical and cultural system, an ‘augmentation’ system. We are born with a particular set of genetic capabilities, and then we build on these innate capabilities using tools, techniques, skills, language and technology. There is no ‘naked ape’; from the moment we are born we are always already augmented by language, tools and technologies. This augmentation system defines the limits of what is possible for us as a species.

One dream in particular has recurred throughout this book: a device that ‘enables associative connections that attempt to partially reflect the ‘intricate web of trails carried by the cells of the brain’ (Wardrip-Fruin 2003, 35). More precisely, a tool for thought – a tool that might organize the mass of deeply tangled data that surrounds us. For the world grows more and more complex every day, and the information we are expected to keep track of proliferates at every click. How are we to keep track of the mess? The problem that Bush identified in 1945 is just as urgent today.

Dot Con: The Art of Scamming a Scammer (James Veitch)

And the poem?

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